Two companies supported by HiTT get outstanding reward.

Two companies supported by HiTT get outstanding reward.

HiTT celebrates that Barcelona Activa recognizes Qbeast with an award for the best project of high technological impact and Hospital Vall d’Hebron obtains more than 1M€ benefit from the exploitation of a patent license.  Qbeast is a ‘Big Data’ analysis platform that allows the indexation and visualization of data in a responsive, clear and intuitive way.   On  February, Barcelona Activa has awarded the Qbeast startup for the best business project with a high technological impact, with an economic contribution of 5.000€, in the framework of the fifth edition of the Preacceleració Program. Qbeast has also obtained an office space in the MediaTIC Incubator. HiTT has pleased worked all along with Qbeast to define its business model and its development path.  Also in February Hospital Vall d’Hebron has published that Hospital Vall d’Hebron has obtained more than € 1M benefit from the licence of a new treatment for a rare disease, representing the highest economic benefit generated by a state research institute by a patent licence. Doctors Ramon Martí (VHIR) and Michio Hirano (Columbia University) discovered the treatment in 2013. Afterwards, they licenced the patent to Modis Therapeutics, an American company, to develop the therapy. HiTT participated in the evidence review to complete the evidence package of the value dossier of the drug.   These two successful stories reinforce the idea of Barcelona as a strong life sciences and health HUB articulated around powerful core formed by public hospitals, pharmaceutical companies and research centres with which HiTT has strong and long-standing relationships.  HiTT is an international market access consultancy with a payer perspective, with offices in Barcelona born in 2013. HiTT focuses its main activity on advising and accompanying institutions, research centres and private companies in the health sector, who wish to develop and implement innovative projects to add value to the health...
Perspectives to mitigate payer uncertainty in health technology assessment of novel oncology drugs

Perspectives to mitigate payer uncertainty in health technology assessment of novel oncology drugs

Oriol Sola Morales is the co-author of an article about reimbursement decisions on new oncology drugs. You can access to the entire article in this link. Reimbursement decisions on new oncology drugs are now often made while uncertainty remains about a drug’s risk–benefit profile. One consequence of this is a delay in patient access to valuable new medicines. The article explains the authors perspectives on strategies to mitigate sources of uncertainty in the health technology assessment process. These include flexible approaches for evaluating the additional benefit, such as better use of surrogate endpoints and health-related quality of life data, and renewed research efforts to define the optimal target population and generate real-world evidence post-authorisation. KEYWORDS: Oncology, patient access, HTA, reimbursement, surrogate endpoint, Health Related Quality of Life...
New acquisition cost of Repatha

New acquisition cost of Repatha

Today we learn that Amgen is lowering the acquisition cost of Repatha by 60% in the US. This is an excellent message for millions of users who preferred risk to co-pay. It is indeed a significant change, not only for the potential change it is making on access to the drug and the harm to its direct competitor, but also it sends a very powerful message to the community: the drug was overpriced by at least 60%. How do we take it from there? Do we just have to wait 1-2 years to make innovation available so that it reaches the appropriate price? The move is giving payers a strong incentive to keep asking for discounts and only build mistrust on...
Gene therapy: Will it deliver its commercial promise?

Gene therapy: Will it deliver its commercial promise?

On April 10th 2018, Goldman Sachs published “The Genome Revolution” report on gene therapy, in which its analyst posed the thought-provoking question: “is curing patients a sustainable business model?” The question comes at a relevant time. Just last week, two of the world’s top pharma giants appear to have taken contrasting stances on the capacity of gene therapies to deliver on their expectations of commercial profit. Novartis has entered into an agreement to acquire AveXis, for a whopping $8.7 billion (€7 billion), in the hopes of expanding its capabilities in gene therapy and commercializing a potentially transformative treatment for Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Conversely, GlaxoSmithKline has decided to sell its rare disease gene therapy portfolio to British startup Orchard Therapeutics, for a mere 19.9% equity stake and a seat on the board. The dilemma arises due to the industry’s current business model, which heavily relies on the cash and profits that the products curate over time. In fact, despite their remarkable value for patients and society, and despite their hefty price tag, the attainment of sustained cash flow from “one-shot” cures remains challenging. We need to think beyond health economics, and explore industrial economics, if we wish for gene therapy to succeed. It will be critical not only to restructure the way in which the research and development business is modelled, but also adapt the way in which health care is delivered and financed in the absence of insurable risk. Collaboration between providers, payers and insurers will be key to prevent patients to be deprived of a...
Health Literacy, the resist subject

Health Literacy, the resist subject

According to WHO’s definition, Health literacy refers to the ability of individuals to “gain access to, understand and use information in ways which promote and maintain good health” for themselves, their families and their communities. Between 2009-2012 several countries in Europe participated in the European Health Literacy Survey (HLS-EU) project1. A review of the project by the European Commission in 2015 showed that in Europe we need to pay more attention to Health Literacy. In addition, we are not training our healthcare professionals in the management of low health literacy. In the United States, for instance, there are residency programs, for doctors, as well as for nurses and pharmacists, that already include health literacy within their curriculum. Should we not work with our decisionmakers to foster appropriate access to appropriate care? There is a lot of work to do to understand the increasing complexity of healthcare, and how to streamline it to achieve equitable health....
Innovative public purchase

Innovative public purchase

During The last two months HiTT has been working in 2 different projects of innovative public purchase, and last week we finally have presented them to the regional health service call. The Innovative public purchase is a tool used by the EU to foster the innovation purchase from the public institutions. It is a contract that public institution offers, to satisfy a present need through an innovative solution. The basis is the purchase through the service demand rather than from the solution supply. Both projects try to redefine the relationship between professionals and patients; the two projects are focused on the information system for the patient profile determination. That is to say, the personalization of the health through the phenotypes analysis and the revealed behaviour, not through the genomic studies. We hope we can continue along these...